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This Week: Hillary Clinton’s Inclusive Economy

This Week: Hillary Clinton’s Inclusive Economy

This week, Hillary Clinton outlined her plan to build an inclusive economy — one in which the nearly 1 in 5 Americans living with disabilities are able to participate fully in the workforce. In contrast to Donald Trump, who made headlines during the campaign for mocking a reporter’s disability, Clinton has outlined an economy where everyone is treated with respect, and has specific plans to expand opportunities for persons with disabilities. Some of these include eliminating the subminimum wage, making colleges and universities more accessible, and partnering with businesses and other stakeholders to expand access to good jobs for people with disabilities.

The campaign introduced a new testimonial ad and a new testimonial web video highlighting Hillary Clinton’s commitment to fighting for persons with disabilities.

Watch the ad here and the web video here.

See some of the coverage below:

New York Times:

On Wednesday. . .Mrs. Clinton discussed her vision for an “inclusive economy” with expanded job opportunities for what she called “a group of Americans who are, too often, invisible, overlooked and undervalued — who have so much to offer, but are given far too few chances to prove it”. . .Though Mrs. Clinton made no mention of the moment last year when Mr. Trump mocked a New York Times reporter. . .she may not have had to: The incident has earned Mr. Trump some of his most blistering ratings in focus groups

Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi, the president of RespectAbility, an advocacy group, said. . . that Mr. Trump’s behavior had served as a galvanizing force. “I don’t think there’s a person with a disability on the planet who has never been made fun of,” said Ms. Mizrahi, who has dyslexia and is raising a child with physical disabilities. “Every person with a disability knows what it’s like to live with stigma.”

On MSNBC, House Minority Leader Steny Hoyer praised Hillary Clinton for dropping the “dis” and “focus[ing]  on the ability” by putting forth an economic plan that offers opportunities to all Americans:

WATCH

MSNBC

Later, he said that Hillary Clinton has demonstrated a vision for America and the strength to get this done, making her the kind of person he trusts with his country, children, and self:

WATCH

Fox5

Tim Kaine was also on the campaign trail this week discussing his and Hillary Clinton’s plan to build an inclusive economy, shedding light on critical issues for the disabled community:

WATCH

Kaine in Reno

Washington PostClinton makes an unusual push: To win over disabled people and their families

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is pushing intensively to win over a group of voters who don’t typically get much attention during elections but who have become an increasingly potent political force: disabled people and their families.

Nearly 1 in 5 Americans has a disability of some sort, according to a report last year by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and that does not take into account family, friends or co-workers sensitive to the challenges those individuals face. And among veterans, nearly 4 million live with service-related disabilities, according to the Census Bureau.

CNN: Clinton ignores Trump, delivers speech on helping disabled

The Democratic presidential nominee forcefully argued in favor of giving people with disabilities an equal chance at success during an event here, saying defending the disabled would be “a vital aspect of my presidency.” The speech offered implicit contrast with Trump — who last year memorably mocked New York Times reporter Serge Kovaleski, whose arthrogryposis impairs the movements in his arms. But Clinton entirely ignored the Republican nominee during the event, never using his name in the roughly 30-minute speech.

NPR: Clinton Puts Focus On 56 Million ‘Invisible’ Voters With Disabilities

Leading into the Clinton speech, Ladau says, there was quite a buzz in the disability community. . . “This is starting to indicate that we are being taken seriously as a large population, as a group of voters who can legitimately contribute to the outcome of the election,” says Ladau. Clinton maintained a positive message throughout, threading together familiar stories she tells often on the campaign trail, about her time as a young lawyer working for the Children’s Defense Fund, trying to get disabled children access to school, and about some of the people with disabilities she has met, worked with and been inspired by over the years.

The Atlanta-Journal Constitution: Clinton makes an appeal to disabled
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is pushing intensively to win over a group of voters who don’t typically get much attention during elections but who have become an increasingly potent political force: disabled people and their families. . .One very visible piece of the effort came Wednesday in a policy speech here devoted to initiatives to more fully integrate those with disabilities into the nation’s economy. It is an issue, Clinton said, that “really goes to the heart of who we are as Americans.” Speaking in a packed community-center gym in this presidential battleground state, Clinton pledged to fully support “a group of Americans who are, too often, invisible, overlooked and undervalued, who have so much to offer but are given too few chances to prove it.”

LA Times: Hillary Clinton lays out education and jobs plans for Americans with disabilities

“Across the country, people with disabilities are running businesses, teaching students, caring for our loved ones,” she said. “They’re holding public office, making breakthrough scientific discoveries, reporting the news, and creating art that inspires and challenges us.”

People with disabilities “have so much to offer, but are given too few chances to prove it,” she said.  ”Whether they can participate in our economy and lead rich, full lives . . . is a reflection on us as a country,” Clinton said. “And right now, in too many ways, we are falling short.” If elected, Clinton said she would work to make colleges more accessible, increase economic opportunities for people with disabilities and eliminate lower minimum wage standard for their paychecks.

Disability Scoop: In Rare Move, Clinton Courts Disability Vote
This isn’t the first time that Clinton has addressed disabilities in her bid for the White House. Several speakers at the Democratic National Convention this summer spoke about disabilities and Clinton previously released an autism plan and talked about her opposition to subminimum wage.

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